Page 42 - 2011 Guide to Family Violence Laws

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37
STEP BY STEP
RESTRAINING ORDER INSTRUCTIONS
Getting your own restraining order may seem complicated.
Try not to be discouraged by the number of steps involved.
You will be better prepared to use the court protections
available to you if you have accurate and complete
information. You may need to read this section more than
once. Remember, if you have questions or need help, call
your local domestic violence shelter program.
The following is the basic information you need to apply for a restraining order
without an attorney. Procedures may vary slightly in your court.
1. GET THE FORMS AND PICK A COURT.
Go to the
clerks’ office
of the Superior Court you have chosen. In most
circumstances you have to pick the court that is closest to where you or your
partner lives. Check the Resource Directory at the end of the
Guide
for a list of
courts. Ask the person behind the desk for the forms to request a restraining
order. The form is also called an "Application for Relief from Abuse." You can
also get court forms from the website for the Judicial Branch at
www.jud.state.ct.us
.
Description of forms for restraining orders
Application for Relief from Abuse form:
You must complete this form.
In this form you will tell the judge what protection you want from the
court and what orders you are asking the judge to make.
Affidavit - Relief from Abuse form:
You must complete this form.
In this
form you will tell the judge why you need protection from the court. You
must include information about the violence or threats of violence your
partner has committed against you and/or your children.
Affidavit Concerning Children form:
You must complete this form if you
are asking for temporary custody of your children.
In this form you will
tell the judge where your children have lived for the past five years and
whether there have ever been any other court cases concerning the
custody of your children. (Note: If you are concerned that disclosing your
address could put you or your children in danger, you can ask the court
to protect your address.
See
“Sample Request for Nondisclosure of
Location Information” on page 68.)