Page 23 - 2011 Guide to Family Violence Laws

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18
Are there situations when a
protective order may not help
me?
A protective order may not help you
if your partner does not care about
breaking the law or following a court
order. It is possible that he will not
care about the protective order and
may continue to try to hurt you even
if you have the order. If you think
your partner will not obey the order
then you may want to call the local
domestic violence program to help
you identify other ways to keep you
safe.
How long does the protective
order last?
The protective order generally lasts
until the end of the court case,
unless the judge has ended the
protective order before then. The
specific conditions of the protective
order can be modified or changed by
the judge at any time, however.
Only a judge can change the order.
A judge may also order that the
protective order remain in effect
during a period of probation if your
partner is convicted of a family
violence crime.
Will I be notified if the protective
order is changed?
Probably not. There is no guarantee
that you will be notified if the order
is changed, so it is very important
for you to call the Family Violence
Victim Advocate, a Family Relations
Counselor, or the prosecutor
regularly to find out if there is any
change in your case.
Will I be notified when the
protective order ends?
Yes. The Office of Victim Services,
or OVS for short, sends letters to
victims when the protective order
ends. OVS will send the letter to the
address that appears on your
original protective order. However,
if your address changes during the
criminal case, the letter may not
reach you. Therefore, it is very
important for you to call the Family
Violence Victim Advocate, a Family
Relations Counselor, or the
prosecutor regularly to find out if
there is any change in your case.
Enforcing an Order of Protection from a Court in Another State
Police in Connecticut are required to enforce orders of protection from other states,
U.S. territories or Indian tribes. This means that if you have a court order from
another state that protects you from your partner’s violence, your partner can be
arrested if he does any of the following things in Connecticut:
Threatens or physically hurts you; or
Contacts you or comes near you when the order says he is not allowed to do
so.
To prove that you have an order from a court in another state, it will be very
important to show a copy of the order to the police. The copy does NOT have to be a
certified copy. The law says that the police must enforce an order that appears
authentic, even if the order is not in their computer base.